Thursday, July 24, 2014

Yelp Elite Tee Party at Cinnabar Hills




Photo Courtesy: Alex Liu
 From all of us at Cinnabar Hills, thank you attending the Yelp Tee Party!  A special thanks to soon to be former and up and coming South Bay CMs Abby S. and Candice G for helping us organize the Tee Party.
All of us agree that all of you are the BEST group we have hosted here at Cinnabar.
Thank you again for attending, and please keep us in mind for future golf and or/special events.
Photo Courtesy: Alex Liu
Photo Courtesy: Alex Liu
Photo Courtesy: Alex Liu

Photo Courtesy: Alex Liu

Friday, April 4, 2014

Masters 1996

Less than a week to the Masters. This is such an exciting time of the year for sports fans. Thinking back to the most memorable Sundays of the Masters, one that stands out may not have had so much to do with who won, but rather, who didn't win. In 1996, the special Sunday we all look forward to, became increasingly difficult to watch.

Greg Norman started out leading after each of the three first rounds. With scores of 63-69-71, he was miles ahead of the rest of the field. This could be his first Masters win, after finishing runner-up in 1986 and 1987. Nick Faldo, already a two-time winner at the Masters, was in second place, six shots behind Norman. Sunday was looking like it would be a relaxing journey to first place for the Aussie. After starting off with a bogey, Norman settled down and birdied the second hole. One more bogey at the fourth wasn't causing any alarm, but it was towards the turn that things started happening. Faldo crept closer, and after Norman's bogey-bogey-bogey-double on holes 9 through 12, the spectators who had been wishing for an exciting Sunday started cringing in their seats. This was a tough Masters to watch. After the +5 over four holes, Faldo was now ahead by two shots. Norman had no chance of coming back. He ended up with a 78 on the final day, 15 shots higher than his Thursday opening round.
Nick Faldo's signature in the Masters Champions picture, located in the
Brandenburg Historical Golf Museum at Cinnabar Hills.

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Sorenstam's 59

Sunday, March 16, 2014, marked the 13-year anniversary of Annika Sorenstam's 59, the lowest round in LPGA tour history. During the second round of the Standard Register Ping tournament at Moon Valley Country Club in Phoenix, AZ, the Swede was inducted in a club with very few members -- the 59 club.

It was evident that the round was going to be special, right from the start. Beginning on the back nine, Sorenstam started out with eight consecutive birdies. Yes -- eight birdies and eight under par after eight holes. She was 12 under par after 13 holes.

Sorenstam's scorecard during the second round at the Standard Register
Ping Tournament.Starting on the 10th hole, she began
the round with eight straight birdies.


Keeping her game consistent throughout the round, Sorenstam knew she was on track to break 60. "I made such an incredible start," she told ESPN following the round. "I had a lot of thoughts in my head. I was trying to stay calm and hit the good shots, trying to hit it straight every time." On the 17th hole, a 476-yard par 5, Sorenstam drove the ball down the middle and hit a long iron to reach the green on the fly. The 20-foot eagle putt ran through a swale, stopping 8 inches away from the hole for a tap-in birdie. The spectators broke out in applause, and you could feel the tension in the air from the large crowd who now had started following the group.

On the 18th hole, Sorenstam again drove the ball down the middle, hit the green in regulation, and two-putted to finish this memorable round. She leaped into the arms of her caddie, Terry McNamara.

With a total of 25 putts on the 6,459-yard course, Sorenstam missed only one fairway and hit every green in regulation. She recorded a total of 13 birdies, no bogeys, and the rest pars. Her longest par putt was 3,5 feet. "You can use all the words you want -- impressive, simple," said Meg Mallon who played with her. "She put on a putting display, especially on the front side. She hit the right shots. It was the kind of round everyone dreams of playing."


Annika following her 59.
Sorenstam broke a number of records. Her score beat the previous low round of 61, held by Karrie Webb and Se Ri Pak. At 13 under par, she also beat the score in relation to par by two shots, formerly held by Webb and Vicki Fergon. Her front-nine of 28 matched the existing record for nine holes, previously recorded by Mary Beth Zimmerman in 1984.

Making the moment even more special, Sorenstam played this round with her sister, the three-year-younger defending champion of the tournament, Charlotta.

Sorenstam remains, after being retired since 2008, the woman with the most wins in LPGA history with a total of 72. She has overall 89 professional wins, 10 of which are major championship titles. She was inducted in the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2003, and was also the first woman to break the $20 million earning barrier with her $22 million.
Sorenstam is perhaps better known competing in a PGA tour event. In 2003, she was invited to play in the Bank of America Colonial in Fort Worth, Texas. This made her the first woman since Babe Zaharias, who qualified for the 1945 Los Angeles Open, to play in a PGA event, and it wasn't without criticism. Many players voiced their displeasure, but as usual, Sorenstam teed it up on the first hole and split the fairway in two. Playing from the men's tees, Sorenstam shot a first round 71 (+1) but missed the cut after scoring +5 over the qualifying rounds, mainly due to poor putting during the second round. She has since talked about how nervous she was during the event, but she was overall pleased with her performance. The same year, Sorenstam won both the LPGA Championship and the Women's British Open, becoming only the sixth player in LPGA tour history to complete the Career Grand Slam.



Thursday, March 13, 2014

Masters Memories



The Brandenburg Historical Golf Museum holds an incredible collection of Masters memorabilia.
Enjoy every Master's champion's photo and autograph, from
1976 to 1999, in the Brandenburg Museum

With April quickly approaching, one thing is on most golf-lovers' minds: the first major of the year is almost here. Augusta, with its rhododendrons, dogwoods and azaleas all in bloom during the tournament, tend to attract golfers and non-golfers alike.

Much has to do with the beauty of the golf course, but Augusta also seems to throw most players for a loop. There is always excitement on the final day. Leading up to this year's Masters, we will relive some of the memorable events from this tournament.


Seve Ballesteros
Severiano "Seve" Ballesteros
Born in 1957 in Northern Spain, Seve was the youngest of five children. One sibling died in childhood; all others became professional golfers. Seve learned how to play golf with a three-iron given to him by his older brother. The beaches around his home became his practice grounds. When he was supposed to be in school, he often ended up on the beach, practicing with his three-iron. Ballesteros turned pro at the young age of 16. Only two years later, in 1976, he tied with Jack Nicklaus for a second place at The Open, six shots behind Johnny Miller.

Ballesteros had instantly become a household name.

Known for his mastery of posting incredible scores while struggling off the tee, Ballesteros was a true short-game master. He was, literally, all over the place, and because of his creativity, he was a lot of fun to watch. In 1979 during his first Open win, he earned the title "Car Park Champion." This for a good reason: On the 16th hole, a par 4, Ballesteros hit his tee shot into the parking lot. He took his free drop, hit a sand wedge to 18 feet and made the birdie putt. The win made him the youngest winner of the tournament in the 20th century (17-year-old Old Tom Morris won in 1868), and Ballesteros was the first golfer from continental Europe to win a major since Frenchman Arnaud Massy won the Open in 1907.

In 1980, at the age of 23, Seve won his first Masters title. Once again, he was the youngest player to ever win the green jacket. (Tiger Woods has since then beat his record, winning the tournament in 1997 at the age of 21.) Needless to say, Ballesteros was playing some incredible golf.



1983 Masters

In 1983, the field included many successful players: Ben Crenshaw, Tom Kite, Tom Watson, and Craig Stadler to mention a few.

Craig Stadler, the 1982 champion, gives Ballesteros a
hand with his newly earned green jacket
Ballesteros posted a first round of 68 to put him right in the mix. Friday was a wash out. (Looking back at the tournament history, there has been a pattern of weather delays. 1983 was the last time a round was cancelled due to weather.) After recording 70-73 during the second and third rounds, Seve was one shot behind Stadler and Raymond Floyd.

The final round, played on Monday, started out with the scale tipping heavily in Seve's direction. He recorded a birdie on the 1st hole, an eagle on the 2nd, a par on the 3rd and a birdie on the 4th — four under par through four holes. It seemed as if he would run away with the title, but, as mentioned before, Augusta usually has something in its back pocket on the final day. For Ballesteros, the Amen corner brought trouble. He bogeyed the 12th hole, and follow that with a snap-hooked drive into the woods on the 13th, and people started thinking this wasn't over. But Ballesteros did what he was a master at. He pitched out, was able to reach the green in regulation, and he saved his par.
 

An up close photo of Ballesteros,
the Masters Champion from 1983.
“I told my caddie after I parred 13 that ‘from here to the last hole we have to play the last holes in par,’ and we did,” Ballesteros said.
 
Enough said. Ballesteros won by four shots over Crenshaw and Kite.

Read more: http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-tours-news/british-open/2010-07/seve-ballesteros





Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Top Individual Seasons in Men's Golf History


Joe DiMaggio, 1941
What is considered a perfect season? Baseball is mainly judged by statistics: batting average, RBIs, and homeruns to mention some. The best season award may still go to Joe DiMaggio. With the 56-game hitting streak, a record still standing, DiMaggio’s 1941 season is considered one of the most outstanding.

Top individual golf seasons are measured mainly in the events won (majors and non-majors), and the total money earnings in a year. Not as much emphasis is put on an average score or a statistic as in baseball. So deciding on who brings home the title for the best season of all isn't as easy. But there are plenty of players to choose from. 


Bobby Jones, 1930
Records date back from 1870, the first year of the British Open, and the world has seen several tremendous players and seasons. Starting with Bobby Jones' 1930 pre-Masters Grand Slam title: winning the British Amateur, British Open, US Open, and finally the US Amateur, all this as an amateur, is, of course, one of the favorites. Nobody has ever won the Grand Slam since Jones, although six players have completed the Career Grand Slam, winning each major at least once.

In 2000-01, 70 years later, Tiger Woods became one of the first players to come close to complete the Grand Slam since Jones. Woods was the title holder of all four majors simultaneously (he won the US Open, British Open, PGA Championship in the year 2000, and the Masters 2001), but since he didn’t hold all four titles in one calendar year, this wasn’t considered a Grand Slam.

Ben Hogan and Byron Nelson, 1942
Ben Hogan had a number of astonishing seasons. During his 1953 season, he only played in seven events, but after winning five of them, he still lead the PGA tour in wins. He also won all three majors he entered. (At the time, the British Open overlapped with the PGA Championship qualifying rounds; Hogan chose to play in the British Open.)

Byron Nelson, 1945
But above all, according to Brent Kelley of About.com, the best season of all goes to Byron Nelson. (To read Kelley's full article Top 10 Individual Seasons in Men's Golf History, click here.) In 1945, while the world was in the turmoil of World War II, this well-known player had a tremendous golf year. After being exempt from the military service due to a blood disorder, Nelson started his incredible winning streak at the Miami Four-Ball in March. He continued on to win the Charlotte Open, Greensboro Open, Durham Open, Atlanta Open, Montreal Open, Philadelphia Inquirer Invitational, the Chicago Victory National Open, The PGA Championship, the Tam O’Shanter Open, and to finish it up, the Canadian Open. His earnings totaled up to just below $35,000 for these eleven – yes, eleven – consecutive wins. He won a total of 18 tournaments in 1945. (He actually won one additional tournament during the eleven consecutive wins; however, it consisted of only 36 holes and therefor wasn't considered an official tournament.)
"Iron Byron"

Nelson also finished second another seven times, finishing top-two a total of 25 times that year. He had improved his scoring average by one whole shot from the previous year, and played better golf than the PGA had ever seen. His scoring average that year was 68.33; a record that stood for 55 years. (Only to be broken in 2000 by… well, Tiger Woods, of course.) Nelson also won the only major held in 1945, the PGA Championship.
Described as exquisite, Nelson’s swing became the model for the modern golf swing. When the USGA developed a robot to test golf clubs and balls, the robot was nick-named “Iron Byron.”

Interviewed about his incredible season, Nelson said: “At the time I can’t remember feeling much of anything – I was close to being numb. I had this wonderful momentum going and I didn’t seem to have to worry about anything or think about anything – everything I hit went pretty much where I wanted it to go. I was almost in a trance. I don’t know whether the moon got in a certain phase and just hung there or what. I’m inclined to think it was something like that, I really am. I believe we’re all affected by conditions we can’t understand, and that the laws of chance can lead to some strange things. I’m not superstitious, but it’s always struck me funny that you can go for weeks and never see a traffic accident, and then you’ll see three in one day. How do you account for that? I don’t pretend to know.” 

The Brandenburg Historical Golf Museum is the home of some incredible pieces of memorabilia from the Byron Nelson era. From pictures to books, make sure to look through these displays to find these unique items.
Byron Nelson display
Brandenburg Historical Golf Museum
Cinnabar Hills Golf Club
 

Apple Product Design Team Building Event

View from Mountain #6
On Tuesday, Cinnabar Hills hosted a team building event for a group from Apple Product Design. It was a great afternoon with little wind and quite a lot of sun. With about 20 participants, the group first enjoyed a great BBQ lunch with hamburgers, chicken, fruit salad, orzo salad and cookies. After lunch, the group, which had been divided into four teams, continued onto the golf course. The Cinnabar Hills' staff helped assisting the contests, and identified each player's golf ball by marking each ball with the player's team number and name. All participants hit two shots each on Mountain #6 for a closest to the pin. Each player who hit the ball onto the green was awarded one point, and the closest-to-the-pin winner received an extra point. 

We continued to Mountain #9 for a longest drive contest. Again, we put the names on all golf balls, and each player was allowed to hit two shots. Anyone who crossed the hazard got one point. If the ball ended up in the fairway, an extra point was awarded. The longest drive winner received three points for his team.

Longest Drive, Mountain #9

The last part of the event was the putting contest, which consisted of three holes on one of our practice greens. The contest holes were set up with rocks, branches, and other unlikely objects. Points continued to be awarded: 3 points if you holed it on the first stroke, 2 points for a score of 2, and 1 point if you needed 3 shots to finish the hole. All points were added up to see which team won the event.
 
If you are interested in arranging a Team Building event for your business, please contact Marketing Director Cecilia Ashley at cashley@cinnabarhills.com or 408-323-7812.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Furyk's 59 During the BMW Championship brings more attention to past 59's

Jim Furyk
Friday the 13th will have a whole new meaning for Jim Furyk. On September 13th, during the second round of the BMW Championship, Furyk's name was added to a very special list of golfers. This list contains the names of the  few number of players who have shot a 59 during a PGA Tour event. Including Furyk's name, there are six names on the list. One female, Annika Sorenstam, has also managed to post a 59 at an LPGA tour event.

Furyk's incredible round came just days after he was left off the President's Cup team, an event he has been a part of for the past 15 years.

In 1977, Al Geiberger became the first player on the PGA Tour to shoot 59. He did this on the par 72, 7,200-yard long Colonial Country Club in Cordova, Tennessee, during the Danny Thomas Memphis Classic. Nearly 40 years later, while Furyk was on his way to a historic 59, Geiberger was pulling for him. He admits that other players' attempts have only brought more attention to his 1977 round.

The Colonial Country Club has been considered one of the toughest courses on tour, and Geiberger's flawless round happened on a 102-degree, miserably humid day. "You ever go out in something like that, or say you had the flu and you are just trying to get through the day?" Geiberger asked. "You swing a little easier. You aren't thinking about score, but survival. That helped me shoot 59 too. I was thinking more about not collapsing and getting through the round, and then the round evolved from that."
 

Perhaps food for thought for all us non-PGA type golfers, too.

Geiberger lead the tournament by six shots after shooting his 59, only to lose the lead to Gary Player half-way through the final round. Shooting a 32 on the back nine that Sunday, Geiberger ended up winning the tournament by three shots.


The 59-display at the Brandenburg Historical Golf Museum
Cinnabar Hills Golf Club
Chip Beck became the second player on the PGA tour to shoot a 59. In 1991, during the third round of the Las Vegas Invitational, Beck completed this incredible task. With 13 birdies and 5 pars, he has the record for the number of birdies in a round. He ended up third in the tournament.

Beck watched Furyk's round on TV last month, and thought Furyk was on his way to start a new club -- the 58 club. "I thought he might hole it," he said, speaking about the approach shot on the 18th hole. "because after the drive, it was a pretty easy shot." Beck was happy to include Furyk in the exclusive 59 club. Shortly after Furyk's putt dropped, Beck tweeted: "Welcome to the club…6th man to shoot 59, well done Jim #59club.”




Both Geiberger and Beck's clubs used during these incredible and memorable rounds of 59 are on display at the Brandenburg Historical Golf Museum at Cinnabar Hills. Make sure to take an extra look next time you stop by beautiful Cinnabar Hills.



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